SoClean Ranks 54th Fastest Growing Company in North America on Deloitte’s 2018 Technology Fast 500

SoClean, a CPAP sanitizing device company, has been named by Deloitte as one of America’s fastest growing technology companies. SoClean ranked as number 54 on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500 and grew revenues by 2,805%. This ranking considers the 500 fastest growing technology, media, telecommunications, life sciences and energy tech companies in North America.

“We are honored to be recognized by Deloitte for the remarkable growth we have achieved in recent years as we serve a robust and continuously growing number of CPAP patients in the US and Europe,” says Robert Wilkins, CEO of SoClean, in a release. “I am proud of the continuous dedication of our team, and I want to thank our loyal customers who continue to use our products and services. SoClean remains dedicated to raising public awareness of sleep apnea and other sleep breathing disorders, which often go undiagnosed and untreated.”

SoClean has adapted a process using activated oxygen—ozone—that has been shown to destroy up to 99.9% of bacteria and viruses in the mask, hose, and reservoir of CPAP equipment.

“SoClean believes CPAP cleaning should be simple and should only make patients feel better,” says Wilkins. “SoClean’s rapid growth—today recognized by Deloitte—is attributable to the recognition among CPAP patients that our products offer a quicker, easier and most importantly, safe alternative to traditional cleaning methods.”

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2018/12/soclean-fastest-growing/…

Jaws: The Story of a Hidden Epidemic

There’s a silent epidemic in western civilization, and it is right under our noses, according to a new book published by Stanford University Press. Jaws: The Story of a Hidden Epidemic tells the story of how our jaws are getting smaller and our teeth crooked and crowded, creating not only aesthetic challenges but also difficulties with breathing. Modern orthodontics has persuaded us that braces and oral devices can correct these problems. While teeth can certainly be straightened, what about the underlying causes of this rapid shift in oral evolution and the health risks posed by obstructed airways?

Orthodontist Sandra Kahn, DDS, MSD, and evolutionistPaul R. Ehrlich present the biological, dietary, and cultural changes that have driven us toward this major health challenge. They propose simple adjustments that can alleviate this developing crisis, as well as a major alternative to orthodontics that promises more significant long-term relief.

Author Kahn is a graduate from the University of Mexico and the University of the Pacific. She has 25 years of clinical experience in orthodontics and is part of craniofacial anomalies teams at the University of California, San Francisco and Stanford University. Her graduate work at the University of California, Berkeley was on physical anthropology and human craniofacial growth and development. She practices pediatric sleep apnea prevention and whole-body treatment, addressing body and oral posture to develop stronger jaws that fit all 32 teeth and house large healthy airways. She is an international lecturer,

Minnesota OKs Medical Cannabis for Alzheimer’s as “Evidence for Potential Benefits of Medical Cannabis to Improve the Mood, Sleep, and Behavior of Patients”

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) will add Alzheimer’s disease as a new qualifying condition for the state’s medical cannabis program. Under state law, the new condition will take effect in August 2019.

“Any policy decisions about cannabis are difficult due to the relative lack of published scientific evidence,” says Minnesota Commissioner of Health Jan Malcolm, in a release. “However, there is some evidence for potential benefits of medical cannabis to improve the mood, sleep, and behavior of patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.”

As in years past, MDH used a formal petitioning process to solicit public input on potential qualifying conditions. Throughout June and July, Minnesotans submitted petitions to add qualifying conditions. Following this petition period, the process included public comments and a citizens’ review panel. MDH staff also prepared a set of documents summarizing the available research pertaining to the use of medical cannabis for each prospective condition.

Petitioners put forward seven conditions this year: Alzheimer’s disease, hepatitis C, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, opioid use disorder, panic disorder, psoriasis and traumatic brain injury. After reviewing the research summaries and other input, Commissioner Malcolm approved Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects elderly people. It is the most common cause of dementia. Other symptoms include cognitive impairment, delusion, depression, and agitation. The MDH research brief cited two available studies, which found that after cannabis use some patients saw improvements in disruptive nighttime behaviors and agitation.

Under current

WVU Medicine Otolaryngologists Perform State’s First Robotic Sleep Surgery

West Virginia University (WVU) Medicine otolaryngologists Steven Coutras, MD, and Rusha Patel, MD, performed the state’s first robotic tongue base volume reduction procedure to treat a patient with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This procedure is available to patients who have not had success with other sleep apnea interventions.

“Robotic surgery allows us to treat patients who may not be candidates for the traditional approach for a variety of reasons,” Coutras says in a release. “OSA has a significant impact on the lives of our patients, and this treatment can lead to improvements in their ability to breathe, swallow, eat, and sleep.”

Because nocturnal airway collapse in OSA often involves obstruction at the tongue base, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) can be used to treat moderate to severe OSA. Candidates for this procedure have significant obstruction at the tongue base as determined by awake endoscopic exam or by drug-induced sleep endoscopy and do not have retrusive jaw, an inability to extend the neck, or limited ability to open the mouth.

Robotic surgery provides the surgeons with a better view of the tongue base than is allowed by a traditional approach. This allows for increased precision and better access, making sleep apnea surgery available to patients who may not be candidates for the traditional approach.

Robotic surgery cannot be offered to patients who are tolerant of and compliant with continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, therapy. TORS tongue base surgery can be offered

New Collaboration in $45M Clinical Trial to Test Sleep Apnea Treatment in Stroke Survivors

Atlanta-based FusionHealth is collaborating with the University of Michigan for a clinical trial called Sleep SMART (Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial), during which researchers will investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment improves stroke recovery or reduces the likelihood of another stroke.

While the association between stroke and sleep apnea is clear, experts still don’t know the nature of it: whether many patients’ sleep apnea was always there, and may have led to the stroke, whether the sleep apnea was exacerbated or created due to the stroke, or whether it’s a combination of the two. Nonetheless, the association offers a prime treatment opportunity.

“Not only do the majority of post-stroke patients suffer from sleep apnea, but they are also often at a heightened risk of another stroke,” says Jeffrey Durmer, MD, PhD, sleep expert and co-founder of FusionHealth, a sleep health technology company that provides employers and healthcare systems with population-based solutions to address sleep issues such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), in a release. “The results of this study could be revolutionary in providing both preventative and recovery care to patients following a stroke.”

Researchers at 110 sites, via the National Institutes of Health-funded StrokeNet clinical trial network, plan to enroll 3,000 post-stroke patients in this randomized, controlled trial. Patients will begin the trial while still in the hospital, so the treatment group can begin right away, says co-principal investigator Devin Brown, MD, MS, a neurologist

Aeroflow Healthcare Acquires Wheelock Home Medical’s CPAP Resupply Program

Aeroflow Healthcare, a durable medical equipment (DME) provider, acquires Wheelock Home Medical’s continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) resupply program. This line of business ensures medical devices are replaced regularly to fully adhere to patients’ sleep apnea treatment.

The acquisition of Wheelock Home Medical’s program allows CPAP resupply patients in Michigan access to Aeroflow’s advanced resupply process, providing patients with new, sanitized equipment based on their individual replacement schedules. Wheelock Home Medical has planned the transition of care for these patients as a function of closing its business.

“By acquiring Wheelock Home Medical’s CPAP resupply line, Aeroflow expands its geographic reach and is now better equipped to continue its ongoing mission of improving patients’ quality of life,” says Andrew Amoth, corporate development associate, Aeroflow Healthcare, in a release. “The transition of Wheelock’s patient base was executed in a very patient-friendly manner, and Aeroflow will ensure the patients are provided with the service and attention required to support their sleep therapy.”

To provide more patients with exceptional care, Aeroflow states that it will continue to expand via mergers and acquisitions with a strategy mutually beneficial to Aeroflow and the companies and lines of business it acquires. Smaller businesses will receive resources to improve care for future and existing patients.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2018/12/aeroflow-wheelock-cpap-resupply/…

Gift Ideas for Grown-Ups — Special Presents for Special People

gift ideas for grown-ups

What do you get for that special person who is always taking care of others? Our gift ideas for grown-ups is a great place to start. From a good night’s sleep to some pampering, these hand-selected items from our list of favorite things will be sure to please that special person in your life.

 

Bed Jet

gifts for grownupsFrom the hit show Shark Tank, this bed temperature system will settle the age-old battle of the thermostat. One person likes it freezing, the other toasty? No problem. BedJet uses a remote control on your phone to instantly adjust the temperature of your bed to eliminate sweating. Using a quiet fan, it’s easy to install and even easier to use. You can install it on any bed in minutes, and the dual-zone BedJet allows each person to adjust their side to a custom temperature.

 

Chili Pad Cube

gifts for grownupsThe ChiliPad is a water-cooled pad that sits on top of your mattress. The single Cube regulates the temperature for one person, while the Dual Zone Cube allows two people to have their own custom temperature. Pre-warm your bed on chilly nights, while your partner cools their side down. All year long, the Chili Pad can make it possible to turn down the heat or air-conditioning throughout the house and save energy while you still sleep in comfort.

 

Sonno Zona Weighted Blanket

gifts for grownupsFor those who suffer from insomnia, anxiety, restless legs, ADD/ADHD, and many

Will Self-Driving Cars Help a Chronically Sleep-Deprived America?

Being able to snooze while traveling from point A to B has its appeal. Just don’t expect it to resolve most of the country’s sleep problems.

The recently revealed Volvo 360c concept car has made waves, crystallizing the idea of a fully autonomous self-driving vehicle that would conceivably have no need for human control or intervention in most driving environments. Volvo’s concept car would have consumer appeal via two key benefits: it would safely take passengers wherever they need to go, while simultaneously allowing them to fulfill other tasks during the drive, whether that be sleep, work, or play. While still just an idea and not yet in production, the multitasking car has appeal for the ever-increasingly-busy American.

Anyone in the sleep world knows that sleep deprivation is a nationwide public health concern—one in three Americans are sleep-deprived, leading to a host of issues that affect nearly every aspect of a person’s life, from physical health to work productivity to personal relationships. And as we look to America’s future, it’s likely that we’ll only become busier. As technology improves and the tasks we’re able to complete in a day become more numerous, the concept of a dual-purpose vehicle that would allow passengers to get things done (even if that thing is sleep) while traveling to their destination is an attractive one.

The question isn’t if self-driving cars will ever become a reality;

Will Self-Driving Cars Help a Chronically Sleep-Deprived America?

Being able to snooze while traveling from point A to B has its appeal. Just don’t expect it to resolve most of the country’s sleep problems.

The recently revealed Volvo 360c concept car has made waves, crystallizing the idea of a fully autonomous self-driving vehicle that would conceivably have no need for human control or intervention in most driving environments. Volvo’s concept car would have consumer appeal via two key benefits: it would safely take passengers wherever they need to go, while simultaneously allowing them to fulfill other tasks during the drive, whether that be sleep, work, or play. While still just an idea and not yet in production, the multitasking car has appeal for the ever-increasingly-busy American.

Anyone in the sleep world knows that sleep deprivation is a nationwide public health concern—one in three Americans are sleep-deprived, leading to a host of issues that affect nearly every aspect of a person’s life, from physical health to work productivity to personal relationships. And as we look to America’s future, it’s likely that we’ll only become busier. As technology improves and the tasks we’re able to complete in a day become more numerous, the concept of a dual-purpose vehicle that would allow passengers to get things done (even if that thing is sleep) while traveling to their destination is an attractive one.

The question isn’t if self-driving cars will ever become a reality;

Keep Snoring At Bay

We are not new to snoring. Since we were young, we have heard our older relatives including our parents and most especially the guys snoring in their sleep. We often made fun of them as kids not realizing it actually is a medical condition that likewise needs medical attention. The sad reality is that people can actually die from sleep apnea. Breathing is essential to life. You actually cease from breathing for several seconds and it happens multiple times in your sleep.

Sleep apnea management only manages the symptom and does nothing to get to the bottom of the condition. Unfortunately, there is no cure yet for it but many scientific advancements have already been made to try at least overcome the snoring part. Snoring in itself has its hazards even if it is only one of the symptoms of sleep apnea. The loud snoring sound is enough to drive couples apart because of the chronic sleep deprivation that the unfortunate partner has to endure because of the loud snoring sound coming from their snoring partner when they are asleep.

It’s been two decades since doctors fully recognized that breathing that stops and starts during sleep is tied to a host of health issues, even early death, but there still isn’t a treatment that most people find easy to use.

Airway pressure masks, the most common remedy, have improved in design, getting smaller and quieter, but patients still complain about